Simon Clark’s Hotel Midnight Adapted Into Play

hotel midnightTo celebrate the spooky happenings of this Halloween, Simon Clark’s Hotel Midnight has been adapted for the theatre as part of the Manchester Horror Fringe festival.

Three stories by Simon Clark (“Simply the best writer of horror fiction at work in Britain today” – SFX) brought to the stage by Lass Productions and Scytheplays (V for Vendetta).

In Swallowing a Dirty Seed, adapted by Baz Greenland, a reclusive writer allows two lost students to stay overnight at his remote Welsh cottage – but he does not realise just how lost they are.

In They Will Not Rest, adapted by Ross Kelly, the end of the world has come and for most of the world’s population, to sleep means death – but three people have found a way to stay awake, if they can only trust each other.

And in Humpty’s Bones, adapted by Sean Mason, Eden Page discovers that her eccentric archeologist aunt has dug up something very unusual; something that, somehow, Eden knows – and it knows her…

Here is the current schedule:

Studio One @ The King’s Arms: –

Preview performance – Monday 21st October, 6pm – Studio One

Thursday 24th October, 7.30pm – Studio One

Friday 25th October, 9pm – Studio One

The Salmon Room @ The Lass O’Gowrie: –

Tuesday October 29th, 7.30pm – the Lass O’Gowrie

Thursday October 31st, 7.30pm – the Lass O’Gowrie

£8/£7 concs.

For more information on Simon Clark, check out his website here or follow him on Twitter at @hotelmidnight. The ebook for Hotel Midnight is available to buy now.

More information on the Manchester Horror Fringe Festival can be found here.

OUT TODAY: Playwriting: From Page to Stage by Christopher William Hill

Playwriting by Christopher William HillChristopher William Hill is an award-winning playwright and radio dramatist. He was writer-in-residence at Plymouth Theatre Royal and tutors regularly for the Arvon Foundation.

Playwriting: From Page to Stage by Christopher William Hill – Official Blurb

Sitting down to write a play can be a daunting experience and many a script has remained unwritten for fear of trying. Debunking the idea that there is a right way or a wrong way to write a play, Christopher William Hill sets out to demystify the process, guiding the reader every step of the way from page to stage and beyond – because completing a script is only the beginning of the adventure!

With encouraging tips to help first-time writers avoid the pitfalls of constructing a script, and survivor’s-guide notes offering an invaluable insight into how new writing is commissioned and staged, this book has something for every aspiring playwright.

Enjoy, and remember: if you can’t get it right, get it written. Then get it right!

Check out Christopher William Hill’s Top 5 Writing Tips

Playwriting: From Page to Stage by Christopher William Hill is out today and available to buy with a limited time only discount of 30%

Top Five Writing Tips from Christopher William Hill, Author of ‘Playwriting’

Playwriting by Christopher William HillChristopher William Hill is an award-winning playwright and radio dramatist. He was writer-in-residence at Plymouth Theatre Royal and tutors regularly for the Arvon Foundation. His latest book, Playwriting: From Page to Stage, is published at the end of August.

Here, Christopher shares his top five tips for any budding playwrights…

1. If you sit around twiddling your thumbs hoping for divine inspiration to strike you may well be waiting for the rest of your life without once putting pen to paper (or finger to keyboard). As a wise man once said – if you can’t get it right, get it written.

2. Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can start today. Even half an hour’s solid writing can produce immediate results. If you write just 200 words of your play in thirty minutes, that’s 2,000 words in ten days, or 20,000 words in a hundred days (roughly equivalent to a full length play). See how quickly it all adds up?

3. If you find it brain-crushingly scary to start with Act One, Scene One – find another way. Start in the middle of the play if you want, or even at the end. So long as you end up with a complete play it doesn’t matter how you go about constructing it.

4. Without conflict there is no drama, so make the lives of your characters as difficult as you can – thwart their aims and ambitions at every turn. There’s no reason why your play can’t have a happy ending – but it should be a hell of a ride getting there!

5. Don’t let anybody bully you into thinking there’s a right way or a wrong way to write your play – you have to find the way that’s best for you.

Playwriting: From Page to Stage will be published on 31 August 2012. It is available to pre-order now with a limited time only discount of 30%.